Patrick Lew Band: History, Part One (Album Review)
Based out of San Francisco, the Bay Area lo-fi songwriter and musician Patrick Lew recently released an overwhelming 47-song compilation – titled History, Part One – of demos, outtakes, instrumental jams and original tracks, covering years of his home recordings spanning from 2001 through 2016. [Read More...]
Patrick Lew Band: East Bay Kid Song Review
Patrick Lew Band - We're An East Bay Band
This song evokes a lot of responses from me and so I wanted to take my time talking about them. I am going to start with the negative because Patrick and I have known each other for a long time via this media forum and I have always been a fan of his irreverent loutish punk that seems infused with heart and passion at the same time. [Read More...]
Patrick Lew's side project Steel Lions and their album Unfinished Relics is reviewed.
Music comes in many forms. Some of the best has been that which has been made off the cuff. Jimi Hendrix and Cream were masters of just standing around jamming and some of the finest tracks these artists ever made came in such circumstances. And still, what is often erroneously referred to as "lo-fi" can often be remarkably sophisticated, stripped down to the barest essentials and reliant entirely on the skills and talent of the artists.
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Patrick Lew Band's 2003 debut album Psychotic Love is reviewed.
PATRICK LEW BAND is the project of one-man band Patrick Allan Lew. Psychotic Love is an out-of-time, out-of-mind, and out-of-space production self-released on the MP.com label. Lew is an unconventional songwriter and guitarist. Using fragments of standard chords and jagged cadences and syntaxes, his songs comment on the status of the world he experiences, although not necessarily sees. As such, this is emotion-based music. He's listened to his record collection, especially the Fall and late '70s British punk. His songs are about rage -- cultural, individual, political, and sexual -- often, as in the case of "Anti-Fascist Cunt" and "Sarah (The Date With Amusement)" in the same song. But there's more than just venting here. Lew's guitar playing -- primitive and rustily razored as it is -- is completely and utterly compelling. His musical ideas don't add up by themselves, but in the context of songs like "Mr. Gullible," "Hilltop Fields," or "Poignant Romance," they become compositional testimonies to the unruly boundaries that can be found on the fringes of Western harmony and its resultant echoes. This is rock & roll that turns in on itself and turns on the listener as if, by proxy, she were the very object of Lew's raged and alienation. Psychotic Love could have also been entitled "Forthcoming Delusions." It's shrill, atonal, insidious, and quite beautiful in its uncompromisingly twisted fascinations with sex, death, honor, and disorder. [Read More...]